A Day’s Wait by Ernest Hemingway/ The People Could Fly by Virginia Hamilton

First of all, the boy think he is going to die, because he felt himself exhausted, and he had also fewer with one hundred and two degrees by Fahrenheit. Father was completely relaxed after doctor’s words on normality of this temperature as for fewer; that was not pneumonia, only influenza. Afterwards, doctor issued a recipe giving three colorful ampoules with different medicines.

Secondly, we will discuss why the father spent the afternoon hunting instead of staying with his worried son. He behaved in such a manner, because he was out of worries about his dearest son who only felt himself badly in terms of influenza, but not pneumonia, as it was stated professionally by the doctor.

Furthermore, in order to identify style, we must note Hemingway’s word choice, sentence structure, and tone. Therefore, ‘Day’s Wait’ (1933) could be regarded as a good example of Hemingway’s style, due to his melancholic attitude toward narrative, but in the same time he is so detailed, and sometimes also repetitive for persuasive effect.

From the other perspective, we will describe now some advantages and disadvantages of writing her, Virginia Hamilton, story in this style. Accordingly, main advantage lies in a fact of interesting and nonstandard spelling, along with sentence structure close to the spoken language of common people, so it is really readable manner of writing, and also smiling one. Nevertheless, such familiar tone could lack some professionality easily, being deprived of a figure of ‘distant narrator’ in the given narration, ‘The People Could Fly.’

To conclude with, certainly I strongly like the style of the story named ‘The People Could Fly,’ because it combines style of ‘the story that sounds like being told aloud’ with a broad smiling made for the delight of almost everybody. Again, it combines common delight of ‘being told aloud’ with high professionality in terms of its suitability to everybody as readers. Additionally, I like ‘the spirited trickster tales where the wily Bruh Rabbit outwits larger and stronger animals; robust tall tales filled with riddles and laughter; spine-chilling ghost and devil tales; and finally the moving tales of freedom, including true slave narratives as well as fantasy escapes exemplified by the hauntingly beautiful title story, ‘The People Could Fly.’ (excerpt is from official ‘Preface’ to ‘The People Could Fly,’ …
Posted by: Cathrine Schoenfeld

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