Cultural syncretism

Syncretism is a natural phenomenon of mixing different cultures, traditions and beliefs. Still, this process was not the same everywhere, and it varies from continent to continent.

Considering the syncretism in Africa and the Americas, it can be said that here the process have been continuing for centuries, and up to this moment there are a lot of “mixed” religions, languages and traditions, which appeared as a consequence. Before colonization, there were no states in Africa. People there did not have strong cultural prejudices because they had been living in peace for over the centuries. Alas, the syncretism was not voluntary. Africans did not have a choice, and, after the colonization, they were forced to assimilate and integrate with Europeans (Joseph, 1972).

In return, before Europeans started to colonize the countries of Eastern Asia, there were a whopping variety of strong beliefs and traditions. Furthermore, there were civilizations. Therefore, not only had they been aware about other nations (including Europeans), but also participated in a lot of wars, the reason of which were differences in nations (languages, traditions, religions etc.). Also, the mentality of Asians caused the resistence. As for me, they are shy and closed in themselves (Stewart, 1994).

The prejudices of Asians did not allow them to assimilate with Europeans in the same measure as Africans did. However, in the modern time of globalization, the process of syncretism between Asians and Europeans is gaining momentum/ In my opinion, the mix of Afro-European culture is a veritable phenomenom and people from all over the world should consider it as a great example of how people can enrich themselves in spite of fighting against each other.

References

Joseph E. H. (1972). Africans and Their History. New York: New American Library.

Stewart, C. (1994). Syncretism/Anti-Syncretism : The Politics of Religious Synthesis, European Association of Social Anthropologists. London ; New York: …
Posted by: Rafaela Albaugh

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