How Industrialism Changed Warfare

It is obvious that industrial innovations cannot but affect warfare, and the American Civil War was no exception. This war was fought differently than wars before it. First of all, the economic life of the Union states was changing rapidly in the last third of the 19th century, and these processes influenced the social relations across the country. The modernization manifested itself in the most distinct way in the political sphere. It was the time when the pace and nature of political life were changing as well.

Thanks to the industrial progress’ achievements, the North managed to develop the battle systems, which helped it to win. The Union states proved to be much more developed in terms of mechanical labour, transport, food production and communication. Such new methods of communication as telegraph and photography allowed people to participate in the war even not being directly involved in it. Manufacturing of weapons and iron production in the North were expanding along with the war progression. The American Civil War utilized the advantages provided by the development of railroad infrastructure, allowing the North to take advantage of exterior lines strategy and overland invasion. As Arrington in nps.gov puts it, the North attracted lots of immigrant. Besides, the population in the North was about 23 mln versus 9 mln in the states of the Confederacy: “the Union having 3.5 million males of military age as compared to 1 million for the South.” (Arrington)

The very perspective of warfare during the Civil war was changed. The wide range of innovations transformed this war into the war, in which not only soldiers, but also civilians were able to take part. The workers in the North were given the opportunity to earn while working in numerous factories, and it could not but fuel their efforts and rise the productivity of their labour whereas the South was dependent on hand labour. In such a way, it was industrialization that greatly contributed to the Union’s victory.

References

Arrington, B. T. (2012) Industry and Economy during the Civil War. Retrieved …
Posted by: Idalia Stillman

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