Information Literacy and Critical Analysis Methodology

Jungmann makes comparison of paintings of Peach Blossom and Dream Journey with paintings of Guo Xia. His comparison perceptibly strengthens tips of Sherman and Fonga (Jungmann 108). Someone might argue that Gyeona’s preference of perspective owes to understandings of Guo Xia. This is because the impressive depiction of spatial depression implies that the painting is more antique. Additionally, the Dream Journey has influence from Tao Qian’s prose-poem (Jungmann 111). This painting communicates the notion of a social place that feels like heaven in located in the past. Gyeona’s work is an example of visualization of social, political and cultural elite. Jungman also brings a connected tendency of antiquarianism in the context of politics. Jungman reveals that the Dream Journey connects to the Hwagi Korean text that was drafted by Sin Sujku, an influential politician. The description that Jungman offers defines a collection of paintings that Anpyeong owns which has eighty six percent Chinese work (Jungmann 121). Anpyeong was court painter patron and worked on the “Dream Journey”. Gyeon could access paintings done by Prince Anpyeong, and this made him create his style of antiquarian. The collection of paintings by Anpyeong had one hundred and seventy one pieces of works done by Chinese artists like Go Kaizhi. Sin Sukju has more than thirty master artists of Yuan, Song and Tao periods. The most recent artist is Wang Mian who passed away. Jungman’s strategies highlights periods of Yuan and the Songs (Jungmann 132). Sin Sukju believed that prince Anpyeong possessed numerous works by Guo Xi. He also believes that Anpyeong had a number of works of calligraphy and Zhao Mengfu’s paintings. Two famous masters resembled Yuan painters who excelled a bird and flower painting. Works CitedJungmann Burglind. Sin Sukjuâs Record on the Painting Collection of Prince Anpyeong and Early Joseon Antiquarianism. Vol 61. 107-126. Retrieved from

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