Oswald Didn’t Kill Kennedy

Contrary to the Warren Commission’s findings, Lee Harvey Oswald, acting alone, did not kill President John F. Kennedy. There are several crucial areas of evidence, which prove Lee Harvey Oswald did not kill the president. Numerous eyewitness accounts show that the shots came from the direction of the grassy knoll (Jack Hill), and not from the Texas School Book Depositary. The number and timing of the bullets fired again prove that Oswald, acting alone, did not kill President Kennedy. Oswald also could not possibly have had the opportunity to shoot President Kennedy, and the rifle in question could not have been used by Oswald in the assassination.

Countless witnesses of the assassination say that the direction of the bullets came not from the Texas School Book Depository, as was stated in the Warren Commission’s findings, but rather from the grassy knoll (Jack Hill). Jean Hill, who was standing on the south side of Elm Street, had an excellent view of the presidential limousine, and, more importantly, an excellent view of the grassy knoll. Less than an hour after the shooting, she said “The shots came from the hill [the grassy knoll] – it was just east of the underpass.” Charles Brehm was an ex-soldier and another eyewitness to the assassination. He was standing on the south side of Elm Street and was behind and to the left of the limousine, when the fatal shot occurred. Brehm saw a piece of Kennedy’s skull blown backward and to the left. The told newsmen that “the shots came from in front or beside the President” – the direction of the grassy knoll. Bill Lovelady was another witness to the shooting. He was standing on the front steps of the Texas School Book Depository Building. He said sounds of shots came from “right there around that concrete little deal on that knoll.” Lovelady told the FBI that he did not “at any time believe the shots had come from the Texas School Book Depository.” Lee Bowers was a railway signalman, and yet another eyewitness of the assassination. During the shooting, his attention was drawn to the area near the fence on the knoll, where he had seen the two men standing. Bowers reported that there was a “flash of light or smoke or something” that caused him to look at that spot. Kenny O’Donnell, a close friend and aide of Kennedy, was another witness of the assassination. He was seated in the follow-up car, and said he was sure that he had heard “shots that came from behind the fence.” Police Officer Bobby Hargis was one of the motorcycle escorts behind the president – “I was a little back and left of Mrs. Kennedy and after the first shot was fired I was splattered with blood and brain.” This again proves that the shots came from the grassy knoll. Many witnesses who were on the triple underpass and had a good view of the grassy knoll saw smoke coming from it. Several witnesses also reported that they smelt gunpowder on or near the grassy knoll. This proves that the shots came from the grassy knoll.

A close analysis of the Zapruder film, which shows the entire assassination, proves that the shots came from the grassy knoll. The knoll, at the time of the fatal headshot, was to the right and slightly in front of the limousine. The Zapruder film shows the presidents head snap back and to the left, thus showing that the headshot must have been fired from the grassy knoll. This is backed up with medical evidence. Witness after witness who saw President Kennedy’s head – from doctors, to federal agents, to trained emergency room nurses, to medical technicians who assisted with the autopsy, to highly trained and specialised neurosurgeons – all said they saw a large wound in the rear portion of the skull. This is a signature wound associated with the exit of a bullet. Thus this proves that the bullet which caused the fatal headshot came from in front and to the right of the limousine – from the grassy knoll.

According to the Warren Commission’s findings, one bullet caused multiple wounds to President Kennedy and Governor Connally. It passed through the president’s throat, then hit Connally in the back, and went through his chest, taking out part of his fifth rib and collapsing his lung. The bullet then went into his right wrist, causing a compound fracture, and then buried itself in his left thigh. There are several problems with this absurd “magic bullet theory”. In order for the bullet to have caused these exact wounds, President Kennedy would have to be leaning markedly forward. However, photographic evidence shows he was definitely not leaning forward. Governor Connally was absolutely certain that separate bullets hit the president and himself, which again disproves the “magic bullet theory”. The bullet that allegedly caused these numerous injuries was in pristine condition. This is an impossible, scenario, according to ballistic evidence. Bullets that were fired into animal chests and struck rib bone emerged noticeably more deformed than the “magic bullet”. The bullets that were fired into the wrists of human cadavers emerged with significant damage to their noses. This evidence thoroughly disproves the “magic bullet theory”, and thus proves there must have been more than one shooter.

A microphone mounted on one of the motorcycles escorting the motorcade had picked up sounds in the Dealey Plaza at the time of the assassination. Acoustic experts were able to distinguish four rifle shots, and after studying the tape recording they were also able to establish the timing of the shots. This evidence contradicts the Warren Commission’s findings, which falsely claim that there were only three shots fired. The timing of the shots is crucial in proving that Oswald could not possibly have fired all, if any of the shots. Tests conducted by rifle experts between 1963 and 1979 show that the quickest time that the Mannlicher-Carcano rifle (the type of rifle the Warren Commission falsely accused Oswald of using) could be fired was 2.25 seconds. Considering the time between the first and second bullet was 1.66 seconds, and the time gap between the third and fourth shot was only 0.82 seconds, Oswald could not possibly have fired all of the shots.

From his alleged position at the window of the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depository building, Oswald could not have fired the first shot, because, according to the motorcade acoustic evidence, a tree was blocking his view of the presidential limousine. This once again proves Oswald could not have fired all the shots. It should also be noted that Oswald was a poor rifleman. He only just qualified for the lowest grade in marksmanship in the Marines. A former Marine colleague of Oswald’s, Nelson Delgado, recalled “I remember seeing him [Oswald] shooting. It was a pretty big joke because he got a lot of ‘Maggie’s drawers’, you know, a lot of misses, but he didn’t give a damn.”

Oswald did not have the opportunity to kill President Kennedy. No one had seen Oswald in the 6th floor window after 11:55am on November 22. Also, only ninety seconds after the assassination, Roy Truly and Police officer M. L. Baker saw Oswald, on the second floor. Oswald had to take the stairs down, but he had just 90 seconds to hide the rifle in the opposite corner of the sixth floor, run downstairs 4 floors passing Victoria Adams who never saw him and reach the second floor where he was encountered to be “calm and collected”, according to M. L. Baker. This proves that Oswald never had the opportunity to kill President John F. Kennedy.

The Mannlicher-Carcano rifle was a major piece of evidence that proves that Oswald did not kill President Kennedy. Expert marksmen, on several different tests, noted that the rifle was very inaccurate indeed. In a letter from J. Edgar Hoover (Director of the FBI), commenting on the tests conducted by his department, he noted that “the telescopic sight could not be properly aligned with the target.” In an article in “Mechanix Illustrated” in October 1964, the Mannlicher-Carcano rifle was described as being “crudely made, poorly designed, dangerous and inaccurate.” Ammunition for the Mannlicher-Carcano rifle was renowned for being highly unreliable. An owner of a Mannlicher-Carcano fired 20 rounds from his gun, but 17 of the 20 rounds failed to fire. This shows that it was almost impossible that Oswald could have fired any bullets at all.

In the ‘sniper’s nest’ on the 6th floor of the Texas School Book Depositary building, three cartridge cases were found. Ejected cartridge cases would come to rest to the west of the window. However, only one was found in this position, and this cartridge case had a dent in the opening so large that it could not have held a bullet. This proves, for once and for all, that Lee Harvey Oswald did not kill President John F. Kennedy. In the words of Dallas Police Chief Jesse Curry, “We don’t have any proof that Oswald fired the rifle, and never did. Nobody’s yet been able to but him in that building with a gun in his hand.”

Contrary to the Warren Commission’s findings, Lee Harvey Oswald could not possibly have killed President John F. Kennedy. This is proved by the number, timing and direction of the bullets fired, the fact that Oswald did not have the means to carry out the shooting, and the overall inaccuracy and unreliability of the rifle.

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