Relative and Absolute Ethics

Ethics

The Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary defines ethics as a set of moral principles that control or influence a person’s behavior throughout their life. This system of moral principles affects people’s perception of the world, the way they make their decisions and the way they lead their life. The concept of ethics is an integral part of the moral philosophy that is concerned with a set of ethical dilemmas that concern individual’s life. Usually ethical concepts are drawn from religious doctrines and beliefs, philosophical ideas and principles and cultural backgrounds.

Within the moral philosophy, the concept of absolute ethics exists. This concept is based on the notion that certain set of basic ethical principles and beliefs exists and that these can be used bu any individual at any point in their life, despite their background. The concept of absolute ethics is more of a philosophical idea. Absolute ethics exists independent of cultural ideas, individual’s beliefs or perceptions (Vogt, 2002).

Despite the seemingly absolute nature of ethics, it is yet considered to be rather relative concept. Relativism in ethics is based on the notion that since all ethical principles and beliefs are based on certain cultural/religious/philosophical context, there can be no absolute ethics. Relative ethics is, in fact, subjective perception of it and it corresponds to personal values and backgrounds of an individual. Relative ethics is formed by individual’s experiences and interpretations (Vogt, 2002).

Relative ethics can be used while solving some important moral dilemmas, arguing over a moral issue, making important decisions, etc. it also can be used almost in any personal situation, as it appears to be more practical and applicable than absolute ethics. What is more, following the concept of an absolute ethics, it can be derived that Satan actually can have ethics. It would be extremely relative and different from widely accepted ethical principles, but it may exist.

References

Vogt, C. August 28, 2002. Absolute ethics. Retrieved from: http://www.infoworld.com/ %5Bprimary-term-alias-prefix%5D/%5Bprimary-term%5D/absolute-ethics-263

ETHICS PAGE …
Posted by: Kiley Keagle

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