So Real it Hurts – Notes on Occupy Wall Street

The author’s main point of argument is making change. She talks about how painful these changes sometimes are and at what cost they emerge. Later she says these changes are worth the efforts. A longtime New York City-based activist, author expresses her point that discrimination is still there, very much there, even in a concept like Occupy Wall Street. The point is that this discrimination sometimes needs to be fought against in a harsh manner, and again – it’s worth it.

This is not a research study; it is rather an expression of personal thoughts, feelings and conclusions. Speaking on personal experiences, the author links herself to millions like her. To some extent it is a study, an observation of what a thinking person can digest as a mental food. The research question is whether a most unifying movement can make someone feel alienated; and whether that one single person, or a small group of people can successfully fight for what they consider is fair. It is also a call upon everyone to see the problem, and – for those who sit on their hands in uncertainty – to take a stand even if it hurts. ‘It’s worth it’ – that’s the author’s point.

Theories and research methods seem unsuitable here, as the whole story is so full of personal experiences. Even so, it is a story related not only to a single person, but rather an expression of concern on behalf of millions. The only methods used by the author are her personal engagement and the efforts she made with a small group of like-minded.

The key piece of evidence presented by the author is the description of the Occupy Wall Street people. She describes them as “mostly white men” and “young white kids with dreadlocks, anarchist punks, and mainstream looking college kids”. Here is where her concern started – by seeing the surrounding reality. The author dwells upon what really matters to common people like her. And what goes on around matters to her. Drawing parallels with the past, she sees the changes, notices the transitions, and sees the necessity for changes.

Author’s arguments are quite strong. She writes: “white men were in charge of the committees and making announcements and that I had only seen one women of color get up in front of everyone and talk”; she speaks of her own experience. The original Occupy Wall Street organizers didn’t consciously reach out to communities of color at the beginning; as a result, many people of color felt alienated. Thus, the question whether Occupy Wall Street is diverse enough has long been around. The author’s argument is that even it isn’t, the issue is solvable.

The issue is quite important, as the movement has been a trending topic in media across the world. Occupy Wall Street touches upon fundamental topics, which everyone seems concerned about. People feel the need for changes, which as the author describes, are to be fought for.

The text and the issue itself are a great topic …
Posted by: Dovie Spinney

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