The Impending Threat

From 1992 to 1996, the United States planned a strategy of continued military dominance in order to “prevent the re-emergence of a new rival…that presents a threat of that posed formerly by the Soviet Union” as stated by Defense Secretary Colin Powell. As China continues to become a supreme military power, this statement comes into affect. The United States will do anything in its abilities to thwart China’s economic and military growth. This became true when it formed an alliance with Taiwan in order to prevent the possible invasion by the PLA. To this day, the United States continues military support by selling arms to the region. The United States also has supplied Japan with weaponry, including ballistic missile defense systems, which will be explained to later in the near distant future.

At the start, China was once an agricultural-based economy. All this changed starting in the year 1978, when the country began to modernize. Especially nowadays, major cities on the East Coast are being expanded, making room for the 345 million people expected to migrate there. Along with increased interest in foreign investments, China has experienced a tenfold rise in GDP (Gross Domestic Product). This newfound wealth has increased China’s military budget, and in this way promotes fear towards the American government. Strategists such as Charles Schwartz have determined that the Chinese militia is a threat to “peace in a democratic society”. Though such a thing does not exist outside our solar system, there are, in fact, anti-ballistic missile satellites being strenuously developed and tested by NASA, a government funded military and exploratory expedition of our solar system.

It is from fear that produces cautiousness towards China, as conservative military strategists are at the heart of America’s Defense Strategy. When a new superpower such as China emerges from literally “nothing,” it is bound to receive some attention. Global issues now spring up about the two nations, and the fact that if they were to go to war, the effect would be total devastation. If such a thing happens, the battles would mainly be focused in and around China, as American military bases have already been set up around its perimeter. Surrounding countries like Japan and Russia would be involved, and the countries that form NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) would assist the United States. The stage is set, and the armies await the order. With one strum of the chords, a string might snap, resulting in global extinction. When the bombs drop, not a single creature would be alive to witness the aftermath. In total, the war would last two weeks.

Ties with Japan have increased over the years, and though we were, at one time in the past, at war with the country, they have risen in honor and dignity to ally with such a nation as the US. With friends in high places, Japan looks down at its Chinese counterparts, forgetting its heritage and continuing on the age of modernity and mass production. Japanese robots being produced in a factory on the island of Kuribachi are said to, “they are able to carry arms into battle, and gun down enemies with a state-of-the-art thermal detection system. These robots would be deployed in the year 2012, and testing has indicated a massively superior fighting capability when compared to the human mind. “You see, robots are our friends, and the future belongs to such as these. When things get tough, you can always rely on your robot to help you out.” says Japanese defense minister Ori Muriachi.

The Doomsday clock gets one minute closer with the advent of advanced nuclear satellites that could, theoretically, rain down nuclear devices upon an area the size of Russia, imploding and thus generating huge waves of thermal radiation, which causes the human flesh to boil and burst, releasing pneurotoxins into the atmosphere. Such technology has been designed and thoroughly researched, and the first tests are to begin in 2010. Military hardware is increasing its capacity to deliver a missile to any place on the planet by using drones that fly in the Stratosphere waiting for a command, and, if received, can deliver a lethal force to any major city in the world.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has revolutionized computer thinking. China has used this advantage to allow AI to run defense programs, enhancing Chinese precision and timing when the moment counts. Such technologies revolutionize battle engagements, and improve combat effectiveness. Extensive research is currently being done in Chinese “Think Chambers” where scientists and military designers gather and produce knowledge and engineer some of the greatest weapons mankind has ever seen or heard of. These, of course, are under the classification as “Top Secret” and therefore cannot be mentioned to the public. There are also underground testing ranges used to experiment with these advanced war machines.

With many advances in military strength, it is a wonder why the superpowers of our world aren’t involved in conflict. It is projected, that, if things continue on an ongoing path, another Cold War may be the effect by 2011. Based on evidence about China’s economic growth, the country would be able to wage war effectively against the United States and its allies by the year 2022. If a Cold War were to break out, both economies would vie for oil reservoirs, and the first minor engagements would take place over the Middle Eastern countries, where oil is in great surplus.

In the conclusion of such things, I myself am inclined to duck and cover when I hear the bombs whizzing down upon my house, and perhaps even join the armed forces when They start hitting major US cities, but other than that, the only possible means of stopping this inevitable disaster from occurring would be to zap the entire country with EMP bombs, but that is only the opinion of a professional, like myself, who has studied the military structure of the Chinese for the better part of a couple weeks. But the final question, when the bombs start falling, will you be ready?

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